Khrushchev in New York
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Khrushchev in New York

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Published by Crosscurrents Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • United Nations -- Russia,
  • World politics -- 1955-

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementa documentary record of Nikita S. Khrushchev"s trip to New York, September 19th to October 13th, 1960 including all his speeches and proposals to the United Nations and major addresses and news conferences.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDK275 K5 A32
The Physical Object
Pagination286 p. :
Number of Pages286
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14975282M

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Apr 17,  · Professor Taubman's magisterial KHRUSHCHEV: THE MAN AND HIS ERA (he waited an additional ten years to explore newly opened archives and to conduct extensive interviews in Russia that resulted in a Pulizer Prize and the National Book Critics Award) joins John Lewis Gaddis' THE COLD WAR: A NEW HISTORY and WE NOW KNOW: RETHINKING COLD WAR HISTORY Cited by: Online shopping from a great selection at Books Store. Khrushchev Lied: The Evidence That Every Revelation of Stalin's (and Beria's) Crimes in Nikita Khrushchev's Infamous Secret Speech to the 20th Party is Provably False by Grover Furr (). But it contained very little indeed that was new and a great deal that closely followed accounts of events which had appeared in the West in recent years, such as Svetlana Allilueva’s book, or interviews given by Khrushchev to visiting socialists. Aug 03,  · The New York Times Archives. There is no evidence that the K.G.B. was ever brought into it by Khrushchev, but we know from the book that the Author: Bernard Gwertzman.

Memoirs of Nikita Khrushchev volume 3 statesman [ –] Edited by Sergei Khrushchev the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Harry Orbelian of San Francisco, Edward H. Ladd Some images in the original version of this book are not available for inclusion in the eBook. What was known about Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev during his career was strictly limited by the secretive Soviet government. Little more information was available after he was ousted and became a 'non-person' in the USSR in This pathbreaking book draws for the first time on a wealth of newly released materials - documents from secret former Soviet archives, memoirs of long-silent /5(3). A few days after the Cuban Missile Crisis was resolved, The New York Times ran this extensive piece that chronicled the events of the days up to and during the crisis. REVIEWS OF OTHER BOOKS ABOUT THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS: "The Nuclear Delusion: Soviet-American Relations in the Atomic Age" by George F. Kennan (). Mar 19,  · An event of this magnitude and Khrushchev's participation in it and knowledge of such did not merit in this book much more than a facile treatment. Khrushchev's amazing ability to dodge the various waves of purges is also understated and underanalyzed. His WW2 years and the speech at the 20th congress of the CPSU follow suit.4/5.

In October , Peter Baker of The New York Times and I spoke about Vladimir Putin’s presidency and The Lost Khrushchev at my home university, The New School. October 13, discussion of The Lost Khrushchev with Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute, at Columbia University. Let History Judge was the title that Roy Medvedev gave to an admirable book on Stalin. He has now published a biography of Khrushchev, written, as was the previous book, in the Soviet Union. Medvedev seems to have considerable freedom to write in the USSR (though he has been warned by . Jan 08,  · A National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist“Essential reading for the twenty-first [century].” —Radhika Jones, The New York Times Book ReviewIn the first comprehensive biography of Mikhail Gorbachev, William Taubman shows how a peasant boy clambered to the top of a Brand: New Haven: Yale University Press. In an article in The New York Times in , translator Mark Polizzotti suggested that the phrase was mistranslated at the time and should properly have been translated as "We will outlast you," which gives an entirely different sense to Khrushchev's statement. First Secretary Khrushchev was known for his emotional public image.