lexical representations of Korean causatives and passives
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lexical representations of Korean causatives and passives

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Published by Indiana University Linguistics Club in Bloomington, Ind .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Korean language -- Voice

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Kabyong Park.
ContributionsIndiana University Linguistics Club.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPL921 P38 1986
The Physical Object
Pagination51 p. :
Number of Pages51
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16555274M

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This paper reports a unique state of affairs of "causatives" and "passives" in Korean. The two grammatical notions have long remained unstable due to the fact that certain morphological causatives The applicative account proves to be successful in providing a unified account of Japanese possessive and non-possessive passives, and of Korean possessive passives and causatives. View Show abstract /_Applicatives_in_Korean_causatives_and_passives.   Morphological Causatives and Passives in Korean* Hiroshi Aoyagi Nanzan University 1. Introduction It is well known that causatives and passives may each appear in two distinct forms in Korean, as shown in (1) and (2). (1) a. emeni-ka aitul-eykey ku chayk-ul ilk-key ha-ess-ta mother-nom children-dat that book-acc read-comp   Korean suffix -i can serve multiple voice functions: causative, middle and passive. Suffix -i develops in two directions: causative-to-middle and causative-to-passive. Among the middles, spontaneous -i develops first, followed later by facilitative -i. The causative-passive cline also includes double-marked causatives and passives. • Linguistic cues suggest that versatile suffix -i is

The purpose of this paper is to categorize Korean HI-causatives. Kim () suggests a division into bi-clausal compositional causatives and mono-clausal lexical causatives. According to her suggestion, while compositional HI-causatives possess two verbs, lexical HI-causatives possess only one, since when the originally causative meaning is lost, the verb becomes one lexical :// 6 Causatives 98 Jae Jung Song 7 passives Jaehoon Yeon 8 anaphora and binding Sean Madigan Part III Syntax, Semantics, and their Interface 9 Lexical Semantics: Lexicon‐Syntax interface Seungho Nam 10 focus, Topic, and Contrast Youngchul Jun 11 Case particle Ellipsis Hanjung Lee The Handbook of Korean Linguistics presents state-of-the-art overviews of the linguistic research on the Korean language. • Structured to allow a range of theoretical perspectives in addressing linguistic phenomena • Includes chapters on Old Korean and Middle Korean, present-day language policies in North and South Korea, social aspects of Korean as a heritage language, and honorifics The Handbook of Korean Linguistics presents state-of-the-art overviews of the linguistic research on the Korean language. • Structured to allow a range of theoretical perspectives in addressing linguistic phenomena • Includes chapters on Old Korean and Middle Korean, present-day language policies in North and South Korea, social aspects of Korean as a heritage language, and honorifics ?id=e6QbCQAAQBAJ.

As with lexical passives, lexical causatives are underived. Morphological causatives involve seven allomorphs, four homophonous with the suffixes of the morphological passive. We survey the four patterns of syntactic causatives, and explain the major syntactic differences between morphological and syntactic ://   Applicative selecting causatives: Evidence from Korean. The Korean voice morpheme -i (henceforth, -I morpheme), which surfaces variously as -i, -hi, -li, -ki, is well known for its unusual distribution: it marks seemingly opposite contexts, causatives (1a) and passives (1b) (e.g., Lee )   SONRAI CAUSATIVES AND PASSIVES: TRANSFORMATIONAL VERSUS LEXICAL DERIVATIONS FOR PROPOSITIONAL HEADSl Tim Shopen and Mamadou Konare Department of Linguistics Indiana University 1. Sonrai verbs of the form STEM + NDI Dire Sonrai has a number of verbs of the form STEM + NDI where the stem is itself a ://   Lexical Decomposition, Silent Categories, and the Localizer. hova | | No comments. Resultatives and Causatives - Stanford University. Certain aspects of french grammar are a bit different with the causative than with other two-verb constructions. The causative requires a direct object, which may be either the recipient of the ://